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Annotating RTI data in 3d and 2d

I‚Äôve been talking to a lot people in recent months about annotation frameworks for RTI and today‚Äôs introduction to the #rodeimagingevent (see Hembo's blog post) has crystalised some of these. I was talking to @kathrynpiquette about annotation and I also tweeted a query to @iipimage about it. @portableant¬†suggested annotorious¬†(something that I know our current MSc student Vassilis Valergas has been examining)¬†and also openCanvas was suggested. Continue reading →

Burying the Digital

I am at Museums and the Web this week in Baltimore. I was sat next to @trinkermedia¬†and we were talking enthusiastically about ¬†the physical, tangible and the interactive digital (as usual). Over the last few years we have been digitising very large collections of cuneiform tablets and are mid way through developing an open source Reflectance Transformation Imaging web renderer that will allow interaction with these on mobile devices and desktops. Continue reading →

Symposium at Rochester: Contemporary Themes in 3D Archaeological Computing

I am going to be speaking on December 4th 2013 at a symposium on 3d digital archaeology. The symposium, organised by Renato Perucchi and Elizabeth Colantoni at the University of Rochester,¬†will discuss state-of-the-art multidisciplinary issues bridging the humanities and the applied sciences related to 3D modeling, visualization, and analysis including engineering evaluations of complex archaeological structures and data. Continue reading →

ACRG member moves to University of York

ACRG member, Gareth Beale, has been appointed as Research Fellow at the University of York. Gareth will be based at the Centre for Digital Heritage. In his post as Research Fellow, Gareth will manage and share the coordination of a new international collaboration in Digital Heritage between the Universities of York, Aarhus, Leiden and Uppsala. Continue reading →

#CAAPerth Day Four

<Live blog> 11:38 Interesting to get statistics on usage in the field next season - can get at issues then of serendipitous discovery perhaps. Also discussion of potential impact (good and bad) on evolving archaeology on the site of accessing information before it has been in some way checked or otherwise curated. Also is the immediacy of connection between the field and the spceialists. This relates to ongoing work on fieldwork ethnographies as part of the RCUK Patina Project. Continue reading →

#CAAPerth Day Three

I am jumping between sessions today. <live blog> 10:46 Off to chair session S30 - Computational approaches towards artefacts studies (on behalf of Eleni Kotoula). Session starting at 11:00. 10:45 Examining spatial relationships along the street front. 10:42 Explored overlapping isovists to explore movement around the city, and visual overlaps in order to create visibility connections. Continue reading →

#CAAPerth Day Two – S1 – 3D recording, data capture and visualisation technologies for Rock Art

Chair(s):¬†Geoff Avern, Jo McDonald Discussant(s):¬†Geoff Avern, Jo McDonald Format:¬†Long Paper Presentation with Roundtable Schedule:¬†Tuesday 26th 10:30 - 15:00 Room:¬†Auditorium Venue:¬†University of Western Australia Club Details from:¬†http://caa2013.org/drupal/sessions <live blog below> 12:35 Finished for lunch. 12:30 Q&A: noting that more data is not necessarily a good thing. You can end up with problems due to multiple errors. Continue reading →

#CAAPerth Day Two – opening and first keynote

Day two at @CAAPerth started with an introduction to the conference by Gary Lock. He thanked in particular Arianna Traviglia who brought this week's events to fruition. Thanks Arianna! Gary noted that c. 250¬†had made it to CAA this year - the 41st year CAA has run - with at least 100 from Australia, representing another increase in CAA#s audience. Gary also noted the Nick Ryan bursary which is for current students. It will be voted on electronically and announced a month after the conference. Continue reading →

#CAAPerth – ACRG involvement

Members of the ACRG are out in force at this year's Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA) conference at the University of Western Australia, Perth. Today there were workshops on complex systems simulation and reflectance transformation imaging organised by Tom Brughmans and Iza Romanowska, and by¬†James Miles and Hembo Pagi. Continue reading →